Double Indemnity (1944) 1080p YIFY Movie

Double Indemnity (1944) 1080p

An insurance representative lets himself be talked into a murder/insurance fraud scheme that arouses an insurance investigator's suspicions.

IMDB: 8.34 Likes

  • Genre: Crime | Drama
  • Quality: 1080p
  • Size: 1.70G
  • Resolution: 1920*1080 / 23.976 fpsfps
  • Language: English
  • Run Time: 107
  • IMDB Rating: 8.3/10 
  • MPR: Normal
  • Peers/Seeds: 10 / 32

The Synopsis for Double Indemnity (1944) 1080p

In 1938, Walter Neff, an experienced salesman of the Pacific All Risk Insurance Co., meets the seductive wife of one of his clients, Phyllis Dietrichson, and they have an affair. Phyllis proposes to kill her husband to receive the proceeds of an accident insurance policy and Walter devises a scheme to receive twice the amount based on a double indemnity clause. When Mr. Dietrichson is found dead on a train track, the police accept the determination of accidental death. However, the insurance analyst and Walter's best friend Barton Keyes does not buy the story and suspects that Phyllis has murdered her husband with the help of another man.


The Director and Players for Double Indemnity (1944) 1080p

[Director]Billy Wilder
[Role:]Barbara Stanwyck
[Role:]Edward G. Robinson
[Role:]Fred MacMurray


The Reviews for Double Indemnity (1944) 1080p


Some times, when they least expect it.....Reviewed byjotix100Vote: 10/10

There are occasional times when all the elements come together to make a great film that will stand the passing of time. "Double Indemnity" seems to be an example of this phenomenon.

First, there was a great novel by one of America's best mystery writers, James Cain, who created these characters that seem will live forever in our imagination. Then, the lucky break in getting the right man to direct it, Billy Wilder, a man who knew about how to make a classic out of the material that he adapted with great care and elegance with Raymond Chandler, a man who knew about the genre.

"Double Indemnity" works because it's a story we can relate to. There is a greedy woman trapped in a bad marriage, who sees the opportunity when she encounters an insurance agent who is instantly smitten with her and who has only sex in his mind. The manipulator, Phyllis Dietrichson, doesn't need much to see how Walter desires her. His idea of having her husband sign an insurance policy he knows nothing about, thinking he is doing something else, will prove a fatal flaw in judgment.

Mr. Wilder achieves in this film what others try, with disastrous results. The director, who was working under the old Hays Code, shows so much sex in the film with fully clothed actors, yet one feels the heat exuding from the passion Walter Neff feels for Phyllis. He is a man that will throw everything away because he is blinded by the promise of what his life will be once the husband is out of the picture.

In life, as well as in fiction, there are small and insignificant things that will derail the best laid plans. First, there i Jackson, the man who shouldn't have been smoking at the rear of the train, contemplating the passing landscape. Then, no one counts in the ability of Barton Keys, the man in the agency who has seen it all! Walter and Phyllis didn't take that into consideration and it will backfire on their plan.

We try to make a point to take a look at "Double Indemnity" when it shows on cable from time to time. Barbara Stanwyck makes a magnificent Phyllis. There are no false movements in her performance. Phyllis gets under Walter's skin because she knows where her priorities lie and makes good use of them in order to render Walter helpless under her spell.

Fred McMurray makes a perfect Walter. He is consumed by his passion and he will do anything because of what he perceives will be the reward for doing the crime. Walter Neff was perhaps Mr. McMurray's best creation. He is completely believable and vulnerable.

Edgar G. Robinson, as Barton Keys, makes one of his best performances for the screen. Keys is a man that has seen all the schemes pass by his desk. He is, in a way, Walter's worst nightmare, because working next to Keys, he gets to know how wrong he was in the planning of the crime.

The supporting cast is excellent. Porter Hall, Jean Heather, Tom Powers, Richard Gaines, Fortunio Buonanova and John Philliber are perfect.

The music score of Miklos Rosza gives the film a texture and a dimension that capitalizes on the action it intends to enhance. Also the music of Cesar Franck and Franz Schubert contribute to the atmosphere of the movie. The great cinematography of John Seitz, who will go on to direct films, is another asset in the movie. Edith Head's costumes are absolutely what a woman like Phyllis would wear right down to her ankle bracelet.

This film shows a great man at his best: Billy Wilder!

One of the best films noir ever, Double Indemnity communicates with amazing effectiveness the depths of depravity, greed, lust, and betrayal of the seemingly innocent and beautiful.Reviewed byMichael DeZubiriaVote: 10/10

This is one of the best films of all time, not necessarily because of its story but because of the acting, direction, cinematography, lighting, and just the way that the story itself was told. At the time the film was released, the idea of revealing who the killer was in the opening scene was virtually unheard of, but it ended up being very effective because it allowed the audience to concentrate more on other elements of the film, which was the goal of Billy Wilder, the director. Instead of trying to figure out who the perpetrator was, there is more emphasis on how the crime was pulled off, what mistakes were made during the murder, who betrayed who, how close Barton Keyes (the insurance investigator) was getting to solving the case, and, probably most importantly, what kind of person Walter Neff is and whether or not sympathy should be felt toward him.

Barbara Stanwyck, in one of the most remembered performances of her extensive career, represents (with nearly flawless ease) the cold and ruthless manipulator who has no difficulty in ruining other people's lives in various ways (including death, if necessary) in order to get what she wants. Known in the film community as the `femme fatale,' this is someone who uses her sexual prowess, seductiveness, and emotional detachment to drag an unsuspecting person (generally an interested man) into a scheme from which she is expected to benefit heavily and he is most likely headed for destruction. In these types of films, the man often either finds his life in ruins or ends up dead, as is often (but not always) also the case with the fate of the femme fatale.

Barbara Stanwyck (as Phyllis Dietrichson, the murderous femme fatale in Double Indemnity) and Fred MacMurray (as Walter Neff, her ?victim'), have amazing chemistry on screen. Their attraction is incredibly well portrayed, and the development of their relationship with each other is so convincing that what happens between them almost seems normal. Besides that, their mutually calculated interaction, although it seems at first like it has been rehearsed endlessly and ultimately brought unconvincingly to the screen, is exactly as it was meant to be, because it represents each character's intentions, even very subtly foreshadowing their future betrayals against each other. Phyllis has gone through every word she ever says to Walter in her head. She has practiced what she wants to say when she brings up the idea of life insurance to Walter in the beginning and she knows what she wants to say whenever they interact with each other because she has been planning for quite some time the prospect of murdering her husband in order to collect his fortune. Walter, conversely, methodically makes amorous advances as though this is something that he does regularly, and then ultimately he also plans out his conversations with Phyllis because he begins to suspect her and is sure to tell her only what he wants her to hear. This seemingly stiff dialogue brilliantly represents Phyllis and Walter's precise (and sinister) intentions, and it's quick pace creates a feeling of urgency and restlessness.

Probably the most fascinating and entertaining actor in the film, Edward G. Robinson, plays Barton Keyes, Walter's friend and employer at the insurance company where he works. Keyes is a very suspicious man who closely investigates the insurance claims which come into the company, having a striking history of accurately isolating fraudulent claims and throwing them out. His handling of Phyllis's (and Walter's, technically) claim and the way that he gets closer and closer to the truth create a great atmosphere of tension and drama.

Double Indemnity is nearly flawless. From the shocking and unexpected beginning to the already known but still surprising end, the audience is held rapt by the excellent performances, the brilliant and imaginative direction, and the flawlessly created atmosphere. This is excellent, excellent filmmaking, and is a classic film that should not be missed.

Anytime You Want A Husband Turned Into Cold CashReviewed bybkoganbingVote: 10/10

Billy Wilder's cynical self came to public attention in this classic noir film about a luckless insurance salesman and one coldhearted dame. Double Indemnity skirted the very edges of Code morality and it took years before someone brought James M. Cain's novel to the screen.

According to a book on Billy Wilder the casting of Barbara Stanwyck was a must for Phyllis Dietrichson, otherwise the film might never have been made. Barbara Stanwyck was that rarest of players, one who could be good and convincing in all kinds of parts. Look at the films she got her four Oscar nominations besides Double Indemnity, Stella Dallas, Ball of Fire, and Sorry Wrong Number. Not one of those is similar to any one of the others and Stanwyck was acclaimed in all of them.

Fortunately for Wilder and for Paramount's budget, their leading man was right on the lot. Fred MacMurray who has been playing comedic foils for folks like Carole Lombard, Claudette Colbert, etc. up to that time, made the most of playing the feckless Walter Neff who gets sucked into a homicidal scheme through passion.

Double Indemnity is a landmark film in that it's two leads are really rotten people. Barbara Stanwyck has a husband in Tom Powers she can't stand and would like to bump him off for an insurance settlement and MacMurray's the insurance salesman she beguiles into her plot. Funny thing is that when the mechanics of the murder plot are discussed and formulated, the ideas are all MacMurray's.

Billy Wilder made two other films similar to Double Indemnity where a weak protagonist gets caught up in a filthy scheme. In Sunset Boulevard William Holden plays the gigolo way to well and can't break from unto pain of death. And Kirk Douglas's scheme about exploiting the tragedy of a man trapped in a cave brings him down all the way in Ace in the Hole. I'd be hard pressed to say which of the three men was worse.

The man who brings them down is Edward G. Robinson, the claims investigator in the insurance office where MacMurray works. Robinson is gradually putting the whole thing together and Wilder is at his best with the scenes of Robinson explaining the progress of his investigation to MacMurray with Fred trying to stay one step ahead.

Robinson doesn't usually get enough praise for Double Indemnity. He's got a little man, Hercule Poirot has those little grey cells. Either way both are up to the challenge of solving what looks like a perfect crime. Lot's of Agatha Christie's Belgian sleuth in James M. Cain's Barton Keyes.

Wilder for the one and only time in his career worked with another great mystery writer in Raymond Chandler on the script. It was not a pleasant experience for either. Chandler complained about the working conditions of Hollywood and Wilder complained about Chandler's dissipation. Both were probably right.

Among the supporting cast look for a nice performance by Porter Hall who turns out not to be as valuable witness as Robinson originally thought. The man from Medford may not lie, but he's not above a little chiseling.

Double Indemnity is one eternal classic it will be studied and dissected by film students for centuries.

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