Witness (1985) 1080p YIFY Movie

Witness (1985) 1080p

A young Amish boy is sole witness to a murder; policeman John Book goes into hiding in Amish country to protect him until the trial.

IMDB: 7.41 Likes

  • Genre: Crime | Drama
  • Quality: 1080p
  • Size: 2.14G
  • Resolution: 1920x1080 / 23.976 (23976/1000) FPSfps
  • Language: German
  • Run Time: 113
  • IMDB Rating: 7.4/10 
  • MPR: Normal
  • Peers/Seeds: 0 / 3

The Synopsis for Witness (1985) 1080p

An 8 year old Amish boy and his mother are traveling to Philadelphia, on their way to visit the mother's sister. While waiting at the train station, the young boy witnesses a brutal murder inside one of the bathroom stalls. Police detective John Book is assigned to investigate the murder of the man, who was a undercover cop. Soon after, Book finds out that he's in great danger when the culprits know about his investigation and hides out in the Amish community. There, he learns the way of living among the Amish locals, which consists of non-violence and agriculture. Book soon starts a romance with the mother of the little boy, but their romance is forbidden by the Amish standards. But, it's not long before the bad guys find out Book's whereabouts.


The Director and Players for Witness (1985) 1080p

[Director]Peter Weir
[Role:]Lukas Haas
[Role:]Kelly McGillis
[Role:]Harrison Ford


The Reviews for Witness (1985) 1080p


Great story, great filmmakingReviewed byjmartinssonVote: 8/10

'Witness' is about a guy who is a total product of the big city - he's a tough cop, he relies on cars, phones, and guns - who hides at an Amish farm to prevent a boy (the witness) and himself from being found by the killers.

The film is less about Harrison Ford learning to live among the Amish as it is the Amish learning to live with Ford. He is a man who at first glance has no matching ideals. The film is fantastic on that level, especially thanks to Peter Weir's direction, who brilliantly shows Ford gradually becoming accepted by the Amish men.

There is very little dialogue among the characters, and Rachel (McGillis) talks even less, not because she doesn't have anything to say, but because Amish rules of life don't seem to allow her to. They are presented as a quiet people, so McGillis has the difficult task of making Rachel speak without dialogue, and she does it well, which carries over to Ford (he got an Oscar nomination, she didn't).

It's only at the climax of the film, when the action takes over that the film begins to weaken. The filmmakers seem to have some kind of answer to how the killer's storyline should be resolved, but it's not very good.

Despite the flaw, the film is excellent based on the performances of the cast, the editor who had to put all the dialogue-less scenes together (and later, won the Oscar for it), and Weir's masterful handling of the story.

topnotchReviewed byRobert D. RuplenasVote: 9/10

This is one of those movies whose virtues and subtleties become more and more apparent with subsequent viewings. The crime story is nothing more than a pretense - a "MacGuffin", in Hitchcock's phrase - on which to hang this sensitive and insightful story of the conflict between modernity and the culture of the Amish, which is portrayed here with admiring respect and not a hint of condescension.

Harrison Ford's portrayal of John Book is perhaps his finest work on screen so far. In particular, Book's struggle to suppress his rising attraction for Rachel, and his tormented realization that a relationship between them is not possible, is achingly portrayed. Ford's effort is well-matched by Kelly McGillis, whose beauty here is almost breathtaking. The erotic interplay between them, because it is unconsummated, radiates an almost painful tension, and the easily lampooned "running through the field" scene - because it has been led up to so convincingly - is almost heartbreaking. The character of Eli Lapp, wonderfully played by Jan Rubes, is richly multifaceted. His suspicion of the "English" outsider and his anger at Rachel's attraction to him, is surmounted by an underlying humanity. His parting words to Book, "You be careful out there among them English," are moving testimony to his acceptance of him. His stern yet loving dialogue to his grandson about renouncing hatred and violence is a treasured moment.

Both direction and cinematography are splendid. The simplicity of Amish interiors is shot in a way that makes its austerity almost beautiful, and the barnraising scene is an exercise in cinematic lyricism.

It would be easy to fault the movie for the facile scene in which the punks taunting of Book's newfound friends and protectors drives him over the edge (Eli: "It's not our way, Book" / Book: "No, but it's MY way."), but his gift to the young thug of a bloody nose is mighty satisfying to behold.

My one criticism is with the music; certainly not with the venerable Maurice Jarre's score itself, but with its paltry synthesized realization. They should have found the money to spring for a full orchestra.

In short, a highly satisfying, richly themed, and multifaceted film which is well worth watching.

A brilliant tale of justice and forbidden loveReviewed byjamiecostelo58Vote: 7/10

Witness expertly details the interesting and sometimes difficult lives of people who are not always accepted in the community. In this case it's the Amish. When a young Amish boy witnesses a murder, it's up to Det. John Book to bring the killers to justice. This is probably Harrison Ford's best performance of his career, as Book has to protect the young boy and his mother (a terrific Kelly McGillis) by joining the Amish community and adjusting to their way of life.

It's a very simple script, and McGillis is extremely convincing as Rachel, a mother who gradually falls for the man whose meant to be her protector. The chemistry between McGillis and Ford builds and builds to a divine conclusion, while equally wonderful background music heightens the emotions involved.

The final showdown with the killers makes Witness even more compelling viewing, and certainly proves the point that not everyone is to be trusted...

The lack of dialogue in the scene in which Book and Rachel finally part adds to the sympathetic and emotional impact of their feelings for one another. The simple gaze in their eyes shows this to great effect, and marked a wonderful conclusion to a wonderful and captivating film.

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